Search Results for "rapidly"

Xu Tan – New Museum – June 19th – 21st, 2008

  Benji Okuda instructing a life drawing class, an adult night school group at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Image courtesy of the National Archives, Records of the War Relocation Authority, 1941-1947. June 16, 2008 New Museum Night School: Public Seminar 6 Space within space within space / Things to do while […]

Xu Tan “Searching for Keywords”

A multimedia exhibition by Chinese artist Xu Tan. "Searching for Keywords" explores hidden motivations and intentions of individuals through a high-tech analysis of their vocabulary. The exhibition also allows viewers to add their own entries to create a lexicon of keywords. Through January 28, 2008

Xu Tan "Searching for Keywords"

A multimedia exhibition by Chinese artist Xu Tan. "Searching for Keywords" explores hidden motivations and intentions of individuals through a high-tech analysis of their vocabulary. The exhibition also allows viewers to add their own entries to create a lexicon of keywords. Through January 28, 2008

Nine International Artists Exhibit

June 2nd – July 28th, 2007

Location One presented the second IRP group show of the 2006-2007 season, and featured new work developed by resident artists. The exhibition represented a diverse range of artistic approaches and many are works in progress.

16 May 2007: Richard Minsky, SLART(TM) : Art in Second Life

In Second Life there is a virtual art world where Artists, dealers, curators, collectors and critics are represented by “avatars,” animated characters which can look like anything from realistic humans or animals to cartoons or geometrical objects. At any given time 25-35,000 people are simultaneously occupying this Metaverse. There are over 500 art galleries, and the range of art varies from shopping mall kitsch to huge animated sculptural installations that defy the laws of terrestrial physics. In this world you ARE art.

FAQ

Location One Frequently Asked Questions What is Location One? Art. Music, Performance. Talk. Technology. We are a not-for-profit art center devoted to convergence between visual, performing and digital arts in a time of rapidly changing technology. We serve as a catalyst. Our goals are new ideas, new work, new forms of expression, new capabilities in […]

International Residency Program 2005-2006 – Group Show II

On Thursday, June 1st, Location One opened its Summer exhibition, showcasing new work developed by resident artists from the USA, Finland, Ireland, The Netherlands, Norway, Japan, Greece, and Taiwan who are participating in the Location One 2005-2006 International Residency Program. The show was open to the public through Saturday, July 29th, 2006.

IRP Exhibition Spring 2005 III

IRP Exhibition Spring 2005 III June 4th - July 30th, 2005 featuring Yumiko Furukawa, Kenny Hunter, Wu Ta-Kun, and Mariana Viegas

IRP Exhibition Spring 2005 II

The second of three Spring exhibitions showcasing the work of artists participating in its 2004-2005 International Residency Program. The two installations by Canadian artist Martin Beauregard, and Polish artist Marlena Kudlicka were developed during their residencies at Location One.

dorkbot NYC – March 2005

The twelve thousandth dorkbot-nyc meeting took place on Wednesday, March 2nd, 2005, 7pm. It Featured the lovely and talented: Chris Jordan and Joshua Goldberg, Kelly Dobson, Karla Grundick and Mistress Koyo.

IRP Exhibition 2004

On Thursday, May 27, Location One presented its third annual artist-in-residence group exhibition. Eight works ranging from video, to sculpture, to robotic structures, to interactive installations were developed by emerging international artists during their stay. Featured in the main gallery, the show will be open to the public through Wednesday, June 30th, 2004 and will be streamed live on www.location1.org

Creative Intelligence :: New Work from the MIT Visual Arts Program

Location One has an ongoing informal working relationship with artists from the faculty and student body at MIT. Because of this rewarding association, we occasionally exhibit interesting work on a short-term basis in our galleries or online. On May 20, 2004 students from the MIT Visual Arts Program opened an exhibition entitled, “Creative Intelligence”. Featuring work by Lukas Lysakowski, Hiroharu Mori, Carrie Bodle, Ross Cisneros and Clementine Cummer.

Creative Intelligence :: New Work from the MIT Visual Arts Program

Location One has an ongoing informal working relationship with artists from the faculty and student body at MIT. Because of this rewarding association, we occasionally exhibit interesting work on a short-term basis in our galleries or online. On May 20, 2004 students from the MIT Visual Arts Program opened an exhibition entitled, “Creative Intelligence”. Featuring work by Lukas Lysakowski, Hiroharu Mori, Carrie Bodle, Ross Cisneros and Clementine Cummer.

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White)

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White) is a new video/sound installation in which Xu Tan explores the differences in American and Chinese cultural interpretations of what is “real” and what is “fake”. Although each culture distinguishes and classifies “real” from “fake”, neither clearly defines these terms.

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White)

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White) is a new video/sound installation in which Xu Tan explores the differences in American and Chinese cultural interpretations of what is “real” and what is “fake”. Although each culture distinguishes and classifies “real” from “fake”, neither clearly defines these terms.

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White)

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White) is a new video/sound installation in which Xu Tan explores the differences in American and Chinese cultural interpretations of what is “real” and what is “fake”. Although each culture distinguishes and classifies “real” from “fake”, neither clearly defines these terms.

Xu Tan (China)

Xu Tan (China)

Qing Hua Porcelain (Blue & White) (Location One: 23 May - 29 June, 2002) is a video/sound installation in which Xu Tan explores the differences in American and Chinese cultural interpretations of what is “real” and what is “fake”. Although each culture distinguishes and classifies “real” from “fake”, neither clearly defines these terms.